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Bliss Rapids Snail

ESA Status: Threatened

The endemic Bliss Rapids snail (Taylorconcha serpenticola) has only been found along the middle section of the Snake River in Idaho. This snail lives in springs, spring-fed creeks, and spring-influenced portions of the Snake River. Springs provide stable flows and temperatures, which suits the Bliss Rapid snail’s preference for clear and cold cobble substrate habitat. Changes in flow and temperature can spread fine sediment and rooted macrophytes in the Bliss Rapid snail habitat, and, thus, reduce snail abundance and habitat availability.

The Bliss Rapids snail has not changed its Threatened status since it was first listed on the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1992. In 1995, a Recovery Plan was established for the five ESA listed Snake River snails at the time: Banbury Springs limpet, Bliss Rapids snail, Idaho springsnail, Snake River physa, and Utah valvata snail. The most recent Five-Year Status Review, completed in 2018, found that original threats to the Bliss Rapids snail, like proposed hydroelectric dams, are no longer prevalent. However, other threats are both persisting and increasing. Decreased spring discharge, increased nutrient levels, like nitrates, increased presence of macrophytes, changes land use and agriculture development, and predicted climate changes in temperature and precipitation all pose threats to the Bliss Rapids snail.

The Five-Year Status Review revealed only one of the monitored populations demonstrated a five-year increase in abundance but experienced a significant decline the sixth year. Additionally, since the previous Five-Year Status Review, one spring population has been extirpated making three spring populations extirpated since the time of listing in 1992.

Staff Contact:

Mike Edmondson

Bliss Rapids Snail
Photo Credit: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Bliss Rapids Snail Range
Map Credit: Idaho Department of Fish and Game
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